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  dinsdag 12 december 2017 @ 23:54:26 #151
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
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UFC-USADA loophole could be letting chosen athletes avoid testing in secret

The UFC’s Anti-Doping policy contains a loophole that could let athletes avoid testing by “retiring” and “un-retiring” in secret with the UFC’s permission. USADA refuses to disclose information about the registered testing pool that would prevent these exemptions from staying secret.

Dana White recently claimed that Ronda Rousey isn’t retired, and that “USADA is still popping up at her house testing her, but she refuses to retire.” USADA maintains a database of all tests conducted, but according to this database, Rousey hasn’t been tested at all in 2017.

Rousey was last tested in the fourth quarter of 2016 according to the list. Her last fight was a losing effort to Amanda Nunes at UFC 207 on December 30th, 2016.

Since it’s theoretically possible that Rousey has been in the registered testing pool (RTP) this entire time, but hasn’t been tested, I decided to try to find out exactly what was happening. During that process, I discovered something disconcerting:

There is a loophole in the UFC’s anti-doping policy that allows them to secretly exempt athletes from testing if they so choose.

Exemptions and secrecy
Under the WADA code, athletes returning from retirement have to undergo testing for six months. WADA may give a waiver after consulting the relevant national anti-doping organization and sport federation. Under the UFC’s anti-doping policy, the UFC gives the waiver. I wrote about that here.

That wouldn’t be a big deal if we knew which athletes had retired. If an athlete suspiciously retired and un-retired, skipping the testing pool whenever they didn’t have a fight, we would notice, right? Wrong.

It turns out the UFC and USADA can, and do, hide that information. There is no way for anyone to see who is and is not part of the registered testing pool at any time. USADA cannot or will not confirm which athletes are part of the pool, and the UFC, thus far, haven’t even responded to questions about it.

We have a situation where we can’t find out who is and isn’t in the testing pool, and the UFC president appears to be making incorrect statements about who is and isn’t being tested to the media.

This means, in theory, even if an athlete publicly says they are retired, they might not be. And even if Dana White says they aren’t retired, they might officially be retired as far as USADA is concerned. We would have no way of verifying that information, and Dana has a habit of being less than truthful when it comes to public statements.

Since the names of the athletes in the pool are a secret, and the UFC has the final decision on granting exemptions to retired athletes, there’s nothing stopping the UFC from letting a chosen athlete “retire” to avoid testing, lying to the press about them being retired, then allowing them to “un-retire” just before a fight to avoid months of testing. Their opponent, the media, and the public would have no way of knowing. That’s not to say this is happening, but the system, as it operates now, could allow it to happen.

Have athletes been exempted before?
Normally an athlete has to be in the testing pool for six months if they “un-retire.” In the past this clause was four months. It was part of this four-month testing period that Brock Lesnar skipped when he signed to fight at UFC 200. Instead of being tested for the 16 weeks retired athletes were supposed to under the anti-doping policy, he was tested for around five weeks.

It subsequently emerged that Brock Lesnar provided an out-of-competition sample prior to UFC 200 which was positive for the banned substance clomiphene. The result of the test wasn’t returned until after his UFC 200 bout.

The decision to exempt Lesnar was controversial at the time, even before he tested positive for a banned substance. It’s possible other athletes have had similar exemptions without the public ever becoming aware of it.

According to data provided by @dimspace, there are around 10 athletes (out of around 600), who haven’t been tested at all in 2017, but may have been under contract for at least the past year. USADA’s athlete test history page confirms these athletes haven’t been tested in 2017.

The athletes seem to still be under UFC contract—at least there have been no announcements that they have been released, and they are still on the UFC’s roster page—but they haven’t been tested in 2017.

It’s hard to be sure if they’re still in the registered testing pool, because USADA refuses to say who is actually in the pool. I sent a request to USADA asking which of these athletes are currently in the registered testing pool, but USADA is unable or unwilling to divulge that information.

Why is this an issue?
If you’re a fighter who accepts a bout against someone who hasn’t been tested in a year, it’s important to know if your opponent thought they could be tested at any time, or if they knew for a fact they wouldn’t be tested.

USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a recent interview that even a short period in which a fighter knew they wouldn’t be tested would let athletes cheat. Here’s what Mr. Tygart said about having a two or three week period of no testing, “That’s not an effective program. Someone can go and cheat and we would never know about it.”

If knowing you wouldn’t be tested for three weeks makes the program ineffective, what would knowing you can’t be tested for three months accomplish? What about a year? This is why it’s important for athletes to know if their opponent just got a pass. Right now, they don’t. In fact, USADA actively refuses to disclose the information that would let them know.

The USADA site has this to say about transparency, “Instead of wondering if their competitors or role models are being tested, people can track testing data and see how USADA is working to uphold clean sport.”

There is an argument to be made that USADA shouldn’t be publishing information that could “out” a retired athlete, but the anti-doping organization’s site rightly notes that knowing when your opponent was tested is an important part of a transparent anti-doping program. That’s why the athlete test history exists. Does an athlete’s right to know their opponent had a time period when they were “retired” and could dope without being tested outweigh the right of an athlete to retire without telling anyone? That’s a judgement call.

The UFC doesn’t have a great history when it comes to properly handling fighter exemptions. Recall that ahead of UFC 152, Vitor Belfort was given a therapeutic use exemption for testosterone by the UFC. When tested, Belfort’s free testosterone came back high. Belfort’s opponent was never informed, and the information only came out thanks to an email being circulated to people it shouldn’t have been sent to. Belfort was allowed to compete.

The UFC around that time said they used the Nevada athletic commission’s standards for TUEs. Belfort’s total testosterone came back at over 1,000 ng/dL. NSAC executive director Keith Kizer stated that under Nevada rules, testosterone replacement therapy should be 600-700ng/dL at best.

By hiring USADA to implement their anti-doping policy, the UFC helped create a firewall between themselves and decisions around things like TUEs, which the UFC has been criticized over in the past. The truth is, there probably isn’t a better option than USADA out there to run an independent drug testing program, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be improved.

When the UFC has had the ability to secretly give fighters passes and cover up results in the past, the evidence suggests they have, though the UFC denies there was a “cover-up”. You can argue about whether or not that would happen today, but the optics of the situation means transparency should be favored over opacity to avoid even the impression of favoritism or malfeasance.

USADA could make this situation more transparent by listing which fighters are part of the registered testing pool and updating that list each week. They currently have a list of which fighters have been tested which they update each week, so this shouldn’t be a difficult task.

Instead, USADA refuses to confirm which fighters are part of the registered testing pool at any point. Whether deliberate or not, this opacity means fighters can never be sure if their opponent has actually been part of the registered testing pool prior to them actually being tested.

The UFC has been asked for comment on this story and we will update the post with their response.

https://www.bloodyelbow.c(...)esting-peds-steroids


Where you at Mark Hunt!?

quote:
0s.gif Op dinsdag 12 december 2017 23:37 schreef THEFXR het volgende:

[..]

ja, maar dat is geen publiek contract.
En voor body armor?

[ Bericht 2% gewijzigd door Nober op 13-12-2017 00:27:22 ]
pi_175685622
quote:
0s.gif Op dinsdag 12 december 2017 23:54 schreef Nober het volgende:
UFC-USADA loophole could be letting chosen athletes avoid testing in secret

The UFC’s Anti-Doping policy contains a loophole that could let athletes avoid testing by “retiring” and “un-retiring” in secret with the UFC’s permission. USADA refuses to disclose information about the registered testing pool that would prevent these exemptions from staying secret.

Dana White recently claimed that Ronda Rousey isn’t retired, and that “USADA is still popping up at her house testing her, but she refuses to retire.” USADA maintains a database of all tests conducted, but according to this database, Rousey hasn’t been tested at all in 2017.

Rousey was last tested in the fourth quarter of 2016 according to the list. Her last fight was a losing effort to Amanda Nunes at UFC 207 on December 30th, 2016.

Since it’s theoretically possible that Rousey has been in the registered testing pool (RTP) this entire time, but hasn’t been tested, I decided to try to find out exactly what was happening. During that process, I discovered something disconcerting:

There is a loophole in the UFC’s anti-doping policy that allows them to secretly exempt athletes from testing if they so choose.

Exemptions and secrecy
Under the WADA code, athletes returning from retirement have to undergo testing for six months. WADA may give a waiver after consulting the relevant national anti-doping organization and sport federation. Under the UFC’s anti-doping policy, the UFC gives the waiver. I wrote about that here.

That wouldn’t be a big deal if we knew which athletes had retired. If an athlete suspiciously retired and un-retired, skipping the testing pool whenever they didn’t have a fight, we would notice, right? Wrong.

It turns out the UFC and USADA can, and do, hide that information. There is no way for anyone to see who is and is not part of the registered testing pool at any time. USADA cannot or will not confirm which athletes are part of the pool, and the UFC, thus far, haven’t even responded to questions about it.

We have a situation where we can’t find out who is and isn’t in the testing pool, and the UFC president appears to be making incorrect statements about who is and isn’t being tested to the media.

This means, in theory, even if an athlete publicly says they are retired, they might not be. And even if Dana White says they aren’t retired, they might officially be retired as far as USADA is concerned. We would have no way of verifying that information, and Dana has a habit of being less than truthful when it comes to public statements.

Since the names of the athletes in the pool are a secret, and the UFC has the final decision on granting exemptions to retired athletes, there’s nothing stopping the UFC from letting a chosen athlete “retire” to avoid testing, lying to the press about them being retired, then allowing them to “un-retire” just before a fight to avoid months of testing. Their opponent, the media, and the public would have no way of knowing. That’s not to say this is happening, but the system, as it operates now, could allow it to happen.

Have athletes been exempted before?
Normally an athlete has to be in the testing pool for six months if they “un-retire.” In the past this clause was four months. It was part of this four-month testing period that Brock Lesnar skipped when he signed to fight at UFC 200. Instead of being tested for the 16 weeks retired athletes were supposed to under the anti-doping policy, he was tested for around five weeks.

It subsequently emerged that Brock Lesnar provided an out-of-competition sample prior to UFC 200 which was positive for the banned substance clomiphene. The result of the test wasn’t returned until after his UFC 200 bout.

The decision to exempt Lesnar was controversial at the time, even before he tested positive for a banned substance. It’s possible other athletes have had similar exemptions without the public ever becoming aware of it.

According to data provided by @dimspace, there are around 10 athletes (out of around 600), who haven’t been tested at all in 2017, but may have been under contract for at least the past year. USADA’s athlete test history page confirms these athletes haven’t been tested in 2017.

The athletes seem to still be under UFC contract—at least there have been no announcements that they have been released, and they are still on the UFC’s roster page—but they haven’t been tested in 2017.

It’s hard to be sure if they’re still in the registered testing pool, because USADA refuses to say who is actually in the pool. I sent a request to USADA asking which of these athletes are currently in the registered testing pool, but USADA is unable or unwilling to divulge that information.

Why is this an issue?
If you’re a fighter who accepts a bout against someone who hasn’t been tested in a year, it’s important to know if your opponent thought they could be tested at any time, or if they knew for a fact they wouldn’t be tested.

USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a recent interview that even a short period in which a fighter knew they wouldn’t be tested would let athletes cheat. Here’s what Mr. Tygart said about having a two or three week period of no testing, “That’s not an effective program. Someone can go and cheat and we would never know about it.”

If knowing you wouldn’t be tested for three weeks makes the program ineffective, what would knowing you can’t be tested for three months accomplish? What about a year? This is why it’s important for athletes to know if their opponent just got a pass. Right now, they don’t. In fact, USADA actively refuses to disclose the information that would let them know.

The USADA site has this to say about transparency, “Instead of wondering if their competitors or role models are being tested, people can track testing data and see how USADA is working to uphold clean sport.”

There is an argument to be made that USADA shouldn’t be publishing information that could “out” a retired athlete, but the anti-doping organization’s site rightly notes that knowing when your opponent was tested is an important part of a transparent anti-doping program. That’s why the athlete test history exists. Does an athlete’s right to know their opponent had a time period when they were “retired” and could dope without being tested outweigh the right of an athlete to retire without telling anyone? That’s a judgement call.

The UFC doesn’t have a great history when it comes to properly handling fighter exemptions. Recall that ahead of UFC 152, Vitor Belfort was given a therapeutic use exemption for testosterone by the UFC. When tested, Belfort’s free testosterone came back high. Belfort’s opponent was never informed, and the information only came out thanks to an email being circulated to people it shouldn’t have been sent to. Belfort was allowed to compete.

The UFC around that time said they used the Nevada athletic commission’s standards for TUEs. Belfort’s total testosterone came back at over 1,000 ng/dL. NSAC executive director Keith Kizer stated that under Nevada rules, testosterone replacement therapy should be 600-700ng/dL at best.

By hiring USADA to implement their anti-doping policy, the UFC helped create a firewall between themselves and decisions around things like TUEs, which the UFC has been criticized over in the past. The truth is, there probably isn’t a better option than USADA out there to run an independent drug testing program, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be improved.

When the UFC has had the ability to secretly give fighters passes and cover up results in the past, the evidence suggests they have, though the UFC denies there was a “cover-up”. You can argue about whether or not that would happen today, but the optics of the situation means transparency should be favored over opacity to avoid even the impression of favoritism or malfeasance.

USADA could make this situation more transparent by listing which fighters are part of the registered testing pool and updating that list each week. They currently have a list of which fighters have been tested which they update each week, so this shouldn’t be a difficult task.

Instead, USADA refuses to confirm which fighters are part of the registered testing pool at any point. Whether deliberate or not, this opacity means fighters can never be sure if their opponent has actually been part of the registered testing pool prior to them actually being tested.

The UFC has been asked for comment on this story and we will update the post with their response.

https://www.bloodyelbow.c(...)esting-peds-steroids


Where you at Mark Hunt!?

[..]

En voor body armor?
tldr
Don't worry about the future. Or know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum.
pi_175686317
giphy.gif
pi_175686318
registreer om deze reclame te verbergen
quote:
0s.gif Op dinsdag 12 december 2017 23:54 schreef Nober het volgende:
UFC-USADA loophole could be letting chosen athletes avoid testing in secret

The UFC’s Anti-Doping policy contains a loophole that could let athletes avoid testing by “retiring” and “un-retiring” in secret with the UFC’s permission. USADA refuses to disclose information about the registered testing pool that would prevent these exemptions from staying secret.

Dana White recently claimed that Ronda Rousey isn’t retired, and that “USADA is still popping up at her house testing her, but she refuses to retire.” USADA maintains a database of all tests conducted, but according to this database, Rousey hasn’t been tested at all in 2017.

Rousey was last tested in the fourth quarter of 2016 according to the list. Her last fight was a losing effort to Amanda Nunes at UFC 207 on December 30th, 2016.

Since it’s theoretically possible that Rousey has been in the registered testing pool (RTP) this entire time, but hasn’t been tested, I decided to try to find out exactly what was happening. During that process, I discovered something disconcerting:

There is a loophole in the UFC’s anti-doping policy that allows them to secretly exempt athletes from testing if they so choose.

Exemptions and secrecy
Under the WADA code, athletes returning from retirement have to undergo testing for six months. WADA may give a waiver after consulting the relevant national anti-doping organization and sport federation. Under the UFC’s anti-doping policy, the UFC gives the waiver. I wrote about that here.

That wouldn’t be a big deal if we knew which athletes had retired. If an athlete suspiciously retired and un-retired, skipping the testing pool whenever they didn’t have a fight, we would notice, right? Wrong.

It turns out the UFC and USADA can, and do, hide that information. There is no way for anyone to see who is and is not part of the registered testing pool at any time. USADA cannot or will not confirm which athletes are part of the pool, and the UFC, thus far, haven’t even responded to questions about it.

We have a situation where we can’t find out who is and isn’t in the testing pool, and the UFC president appears to be making incorrect statements about who is and isn’t being tested to the media.

This means, in theory, even if an athlete publicly says they are retired, they might not be. And even if Dana White says they aren’t retired, they might officially be retired as far as USADA is concerned. We would have no way of verifying that information, and Dana has a habit of being less than truthful when it comes to public statements.

Since the names of the athletes in the pool are a secret, and the UFC has the final decision on granting exemptions to retired athletes, there’s nothing stopping the UFC from letting a chosen athlete “retire” to avoid testing, lying to the press about them being retired, then allowing them to “un-retire” just before a fight to avoid months of testing. Their opponent, the media, and the public would have no way of knowing. That’s not to say this is happening, but the system, as it operates now, could allow it to happen.

Have athletes been exempted before?
Normally an athlete has to be in the testing pool for six months if they “un-retire.” In the past this clause was four months. It was part of this four-month testing period that Brock Lesnar skipped when he signed to fight at UFC 200. Instead of being tested for the 16 weeks retired athletes were supposed to under the anti-doping policy, he was tested for around five weeks.

It subsequently emerged that Brock Lesnar provided an out-of-competition sample prior to UFC 200 which was positive for the banned substance clomiphene. The result of the test wasn’t returned until after his UFC 200 bout.

The decision to exempt Lesnar was controversial at the time, even before he tested positive for a banned substance. It’s possible other athletes have had similar exemptions without the public ever becoming aware of it.

According to data provided by @dimspace, there are around 10 athletes (out of around 600), who haven’t been tested at all in 2017, but may have been under contract for at least the past year. USADA’s athlete test history page confirms these athletes haven’t been tested in 2017.

The athletes seem to still be under UFC contract—at least there have been no announcements that they have been released, and they are still on the UFC’s roster page—but they haven’t been tested in 2017.

It’s hard to be sure if they’re still in the registered testing pool, because USADA refuses to say who is actually in the pool. I sent a request to USADA asking which of these athletes are currently in the registered testing pool, but USADA is unable or unwilling to divulge that information.

Why is this an issue?
If you’re a fighter who accepts a bout against someone who hasn’t been tested in a year, it’s important to know if your opponent thought they could be tested at any time, or if they knew for a fact they wouldn’t be tested.

USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a recent interview that even a short period in which a fighter knew they wouldn’t be tested would let athletes cheat. Here’s what Mr. Tygart said about having a two or three week period of no testing, “That’s not an effective program. Someone can go and cheat and we would never know about it.”

If knowing you wouldn’t be tested for three weeks makes the program ineffective, what would knowing you can’t be tested for three months accomplish? What about a year? This is why it’s important for athletes to know if their opponent just got a pass. Right now, they don’t. In fact, USADA actively refuses to disclose the information that would let them know.

The USADA site has this to say about transparency, “Instead of wondering if their competitors or role models are being tested, people can track testing data and see how USADA is working to uphold clean sport.”

There is an argument to be made that USADA shouldn’t be publishing information that could “out” a retired athlete, but the anti-doping organization’s site rightly notes that knowing when your opponent was tested is an important part of a transparent anti-doping program. That’s why the athlete test history exists. Does an athlete’s right to know their opponent had a time period when they were “retired” and could dope without being tested outweigh the right of an athlete to retire without telling anyone? That’s a judgement call.

The UFC doesn’t have a great history when it comes to properly handling fighter exemptions. Recall that ahead of UFC 152, Vitor Belfort was given a therapeutic use exemption for testosterone by the UFC. When tested, Belfort’s free testosterone came back high. Belfort’s opponent was never informed, and the information only came out thanks to an email being circulated to people it shouldn’t have been sent to. Belfort was allowed to compete.

The UFC around that time said they used the Nevada athletic commission’s standards for TUEs. Belfort’s total testosterone came back at over 1,000 ng/dL. NSAC executive director Keith Kizer stated that under Nevada rules, testosterone replacement therapy should be 600-700ng/dL at best.

By hiring USADA to implement their anti-doping policy, the UFC helped create a firewall between themselves and decisions around things like TUEs, which the UFC has been criticized over in the past. The truth is, there probably isn’t a better option than USADA out there to run an independent drug testing program, but that’s not to say it couldn’t be improved.

When the UFC has had the ability to secretly give fighters passes and cover up results in the past, the evidence suggests they have, though the UFC denies there was a “cover-up”. You can argue about whether or not that would happen today, but the optics of the situation means transparency should be favored over opacity to avoid even the impression of favoritism or malfeasance.

USADA could make this situation more transparent by listing which fighters are part of the registered testing pool and updating that list each week. They currently have a list of which fighters have been tested which they update each week, so this shouldn’t be a difficult task.

Instead, USADA refuses to confirm which fighters are part of the registered testing pool at any point. Whether deliberate or not, this opacity means fighters can never be sure if their opponent has actually been part of the registered testing pool prior to them actually being tested.

The UFC has been asked for comment on this story and we will update the post with their response.

https://www.bloodyelbow.c(...)esting-peds-steroids


Where you at Mark Hunt!?

[..]

En voor body armor?
ook niet
  woensdag 13 december 2017 @ 10:15:58 #155
51398 MisterJ.Lo
LL.M (Master of Laws).
pi_175688668
quote:
1s.gif Op dinsdag 12 december 2017 19:58 schreef Aethereal het volgende:

[..]

Lekker boeiend of hij indrukwekkend is, mighty mouse verkoopt de PPVs niet..
Tuurlijk is dat boeiend. Vooral in de UFC wordt je betaalt aan de hand van je prestaties en aantrekkingskracht. Wat Cees geen van beide heeft.
Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl
is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves.
pi_175696989
registreer om deze reclame te verbergen
MMAFighting twitterde op woensdag 13-12-2017 om 14:00:58 Morning Report: Floyd Mayweather says he has multi-fight offer with UFC, can 'make a billion dollars'… https://t.co/IRf1ua7ScE reageer retweet
pi_175697952
quote:
0s.gif Op woensdag 13 december 2017 16:37 schreef THEFXR het volgende:
MMAFighting twitterde op woensdag 13-12-2017 om 14:00:58 Morning Report: Floyd Mayweather says he has multi-fight offer with UFC, can 'make a billion dollars'… https://t.co/IRf1ua7ScE reageer retweet
:')
Don't worry about the future. Or know that worrying is as effective as trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubble gum.
  woensdag 13 december 2017 @ 21:52:13 #159
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
pi_175708645
quote:
1s.gif Op woensdag 13 december 2017 10:15 schreef MisterJ.Lo het volgende:

[..]

Tuurlijk is dat boeiend. Vooral in de UFC wordt je betaalt aan de hand van je prestaties en aantrekkingskracht. Wat Cees geen van beide heeft.
als je dat tegen hem zeg, dan mag je gratis mee als special guest met een van zijn seminars.
  donderdag 14 december 2017 @ 10:45:34 #161
51398 MisterJ.Lo
LL.M (Master of Laws).
pi_175714423
quote:
0s.gif Op woensdag 13 december 2017 22:44 schreef THEFXR het volgende:

[..]

als je dat tegen hem zeg, dan mag je gratis mee als special guest met een van zijn seminars.
Nee ga jij maar gratis mee als special guest met een van zijn seminars.
Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl
is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves.
pi_175714448
quote:
1s.gif Op donderdag 14 december 2017 10:45 schreef MisterJ.Lo het volgende:

[..]

Nee ga jij maar gratis mee als special guest met een van zijn seminars.
die ervaring heb ik al :D
  donderdag 14 december 2017 @ 11:36:53 #164
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
  donderdag 14 december 2017 @ 14:23:00 #165
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
pi_175718640
TUF 27 mogelijk met Woodley & Covington

@kennyflorian
Ah yes, Colby Covington who uses gay slurs, now trying his best to insult referencing people with disabilities. A true class act ladies and gentlemen. ? Maybe after your lawsuit with Werdum you can find the time for a title shot. Watch out for that boomerang effect.

@ColbyCovMMA
Oh hi Kenny! I thought you got fired by fox for plagiarizing? Mustve been #fakenews huh? Tell you what, after I beat Tyrone, I give you permission to come out of retirement and lose another title fight. You don't even have to beat Alex Karalexis, Kit Cope and Sam Stout this time.

[ Bericht 54% gewijzigd door Nober op 14-12-2017 15:58:51 ]
pi_175720843
quote:
0s.gif Op woensdag 13 december 2017 21:52 schreef Nober het volgende:
The, soon former, champ is here.

Hij is er niet echt van onder de indruk, Ngannou hehe. Maar goed, als je de champ bent, en eigenlijk sowieso als tegenstander zijnde laat je natuurlijk niet teveel ontzag merken voor je opponent.
  donderdag 14 december 2017 @ 16:15:07 #167
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
pi_175721116
25007154_146765615976875_8092106732311937024_n.jpg
25013219_1999717843609620_1939493938226266112_n.jpg
DQ8ps7QVoAAegnD.jpg

@arielhelwani
Getting lots of Q's re: Disney/21st Century Fox deal & how it may affect the UFC's TV negotiations. Truth is, not much. FS1/FS2 aren't part of the deal. The local RSNs are but that doesn't affect UFC. Fox News, Fox, Big 10 Net, FS 1/2, Fox Biz, local affiliates are staying put.

If anything, this *could strengthen Fox's pitch to re-up the deal. We'll see. But since Disney isn't a current player in the negotiations & FS1 is staying, no real story re: how it may affect the ongoing negotiations. Fascinating story, though. Great for general sports fans, IMO.

[ Bericht 12% gewijzigd door Nober op 14-12-2017 16:22:00 ]
pi_175721171
Rogan is een pure money hoer geworden hij schijt die podcasts elke dag uit om maar meer geld binnen te slepen. Er zijn gewoon geen interessante podcasts meer.
  donderdag 14 december 2017 @ 16:23:24 #169
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
pi_175721298

quote:
0s.gif Op donderdag 14 december 2017 16:17 schreef THEFXR het volgende:
Rogan is een pure money hoer geworden hij schijt die podcasts elke dag uit om maar meer geld binnen te slepen. Er zijn gewoon geen interessante podcasts meer.
Je ziet ook vaak dezelfde gasten terugkomen uit het comedy wereldje. Joe zal financieel toch wel onafhankelijk zijn?

[ Bericht 60% gewijzigd door Nober op 14-12-2017 22:10:27 ]
pi_175732050
DsiwZr5.gif
pi_175740786
quote:
Geen mispoes, hole in one
pi_175740820
quote:
0s.gif Op donderdag 14 december 2017 16:17 schreef THEFXR het volgende:
Rogan is een pure money hoer geworden hij schijt die podcasts elke dag uit om maar meer geld binnen te slepen. Er zijn gewoon geen interessante podcasts meer.
Is toch meer een hobby van hem dat? Ik luister soms en het kan wel vermakelijk of interessant zijn. Gebruik het ook wel als ik niet in slaap kan vallen.
  vrijdag 15 december 2017 @ 15:16:07 #173
214643 Nober
#Altijdtegenons
pi_175742424
The UFC on FOX 26 official weigh-ins are at 16:00.

1:00

CmH3O9U.png

22:00 Early Prelims
23:00 Prelims
2:00 Main Card
pi_175744577
quote:
0s.gif Op vrijdag 15 december 2017 13:47 schreef 3rr0r het volgende:

[..]

Is toch meer een hobby van hem dat? Ik luister soms en het kan wel vermakelijk of interessant zijn. Gebruik het ook wel als ik niet in slaap kan vallen.
voor de ufc krijgt rogan 300k per ppv en zijn podcast leveren 80k per stuk op. hij is ook 20 miljoen net worth.
day hij zegt comedian te zijn is gewoon liegen tegen zichzelf, want niemand kan daar van leven.
pi_175744612
quote:
0s.gif Op vrijdag 15 december 2017 15:16 schreef Nober het volgende:
The UFC on FOX 26 official weigh-ins are at 16:00.

1:00

[ afbeelding ]

22:00 Early Prelims
23:00 Prelims
2:00 Main Card
zo, lekker om 3.45 al klaar :P
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