abonnementen ibood.com bol.com Gearbest
pi_80373859
SETI_Telescope_Array.jpg


Deze maand is het 50 jaar geleden dat SETI werd opgestart door , de zoektocht naar buitenaards leven. Hier 50 SETI-feitjes op een rij:

quote:
1. Seti stands for the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence.

2. If intelligent aliens are out there, Dr Seth Shostak, the Seti Institute's senior astronomer, believes they will be "thinking machines". He believes a highly advanced species will be several centuries ahead of us in technological development.

3. Professor Duncan Forgan, an astronomer from Edinburgh University, estimates that between 360 and 38,000 life forms capable of interstellar communications have evolved at some point in the history of our galaxy.

4. In April 2006, Dr Shostak predicted we would find evidence of extraterrestrial life between 2020 and 2025. He believes the best way of bringing them up to speed with the human race is to send them the contents of the internet.

5. So far, no alien signals have been heard, however.

6. It was a September 1959 article in the journal Nature that persuaded the scientific community that, despite the unlikely aliens found in the era's Cold War-inspired UFO films, alien intelligence was more likely than not, so kick-starting the Seti project.

7. The search proper began in 1960, however, with "Project Ozma" at the Green Bank radio telescope in West Virginia, America, directed by a Harvard graduate, Frank Drake.

8. Project Ozma was named after the queen of L Frank Baum's fictional land of Oz, a place which is "very far away, difficult to reach, and populated by strange and exotic beings".

9. The Microsoft founder Paul Allen is funding 42 radio antennae – the Allen Telescope Array in California – at a cost of £16m for the Seti project. It powered up this month.

10. When complete, the Allen Telescope Array will have 350 antenna dishes, each six metres in diameter.

11. At the moment, scientists scavenge time on the world's biggest telescopes to hunt for signals. One of the most significant is the Arecibo Observatory radio telescope in Puerto Rico, made famous by Pierce Brosnan in the final sequence of the James Bond film Golden Eye. It's the world's biggest with a 305m diameter.

12. The most promising radio signal found to date, SHGb02+14a, was detected in 2003 at Arecibo. It was found on three occasions but emanates from between the constellations of Pisces and Aries where there are no stars. It is also a very weak signal. Scientists think it may have been due to an astrological phenomenon or a computer glitch.

13. A set of quickly pulsing signals known as LGM1 (Little Green Men) caused great excitement in 1967. It turned out that they were from a previously unknown class of super-dense rotating neutron stars now known as pulsars. The discovery won Tony Hewish, emeritus professor of radio astronomy at Cambridge University, a Nobel prize.

14. While radio telescopes on Earth are tuned into frequencies that scientists believe are the most likely to be used by intelligent life, there have been many attempts to contact aliens by sending signals and objects from Earth to likely-looking stars.

15. In 1974, astronomers sent crude pictures of humans, our DNA and our solar system to the star cluster M13, which is 21,000 light years away and contains a third of a million stars.

16. In 2001 a "reply" to the 1974 message was found in Hampshire in the form of a crop circle, featuring crude pictures of an alien, modified DNA and an improbable solar system. It is believed to be a hoax.

17. Nasa's attempt to communicate with aliens by playing a Beatles track in February 2008 caused consternation. Some scientists pointed out that making a highly advanced race, which might have exhausted all the resources on their planet, aware of our existence might not be the most sensible thing to do.

18. Now an international agreement is in place preventing any reply to an extraterrestrial signal unless there is agreement that it's a good idea.

19. However, if Einstein's theory is correct that it is impossible to travel faster than the speed of light, there is no need to worry. It would take extraterrestrial life-forms millennia to reach us, unless they had the technology to cut corners in space by travelling through highly theoretical tunnels called wormholes. "You're not going to see them in person, I think," Dr Shostak said. "To go from here to the nearest star is a project requiring a 100,000-year trip. And that's longer than you're going to want to sit there eating airline food."

20. But maybe they do have wormhole technology. See No 2.

21. The nearest stars likely to have planets are three parsecs away (one parsec equals 3.26 light years, or 19 million million miles) so even if a common language were found, it would take a century to communicate.

22. Seti hit the headlines in 1977 when a volunteer found a strong signal and wrote "Wow!" in the margin of a printout. The "Wow! Signal", as it came to be known, was never found again despite repeated attempts.

23. Frank Drake's Ozma project was originally kept secret as the observatory was government-funded and nobody wanted to let Congress know they were looking for aliens.

24. Nevertheless, Congress pulled the plug in 1993. The project is now funded by private donations.

25. Five million people have joined a scheme organised by the University of California in 1999 in which home computers help sift the millions of Seti readings during their "downtime" after a special screensaver is downloaded. [email protected] is the world's largest supercomputer.

26. [email protected] can do tens to hundreds of billions of operations per second.

27. There are now lots of group-computing projects using the same software as [email protected], from decoding enigma messages sent in the Second World War to predicting future climates or helping to find a cure for Aids.

28. Searches for other-worldly intelligence also involve looking for signals aliens may have sent us using light waves or infrared as well as radio waves.

29. The Drake equation (N = N* fp ne fl fi fc fL) was created by Frank Drake in 1961 to work out how many intelligent civilisations there may be in our galaxy. The values stand for things such as the number of stars and estimated number of planets. The answer varies from 2.31 to 1,000, as many of the values rely on guesswork.

30. Gene Roddenberry used the equation to justify the number of inhabited planets discovered by the crew of the Starship Enterprise in Star Trek.

31. Scientists admit, however, that aliens may already have tried to contact us with a form of communication completely unknown to us – a bit like trying to make contact with a lost tribe in Borneo using TV signals.

32. In 1950, Italian Nobel laureate and nuclear scientist Enrico Fermi stated the Fermi paradox: there's a high probability of alien life but we haven't detected any yet.

33. In the mid-1990s, Seti scientists thought they were on to something when they picked up a signal every evening at 7pm. It turned out to be from a microwave oven used by technicians in the cellar at the Parkes Observatory in Australia. There is now a note on the microwave asking people not to use it while Seti is active.

34. Other false calls have included signals from electronic garage doors, jet airliners, radios, televisions and even the Pioneer space craft. "We found intelligent life," said Richard Davis, a radio astronomer at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire, "but it was us."

35. The privately funded Seti Institute in California has an annual budget of $7m. It employs 130 staff and was founded 25 years ago in November.

36. The MoD recorded 394 UFO sightings in the UK in the first eight months of this year.

37. In 1996 only six exoplanets – those outside our solar system – had been found. Now nearly 400 have been discovered. Although none are Earth-like, scientists believe it is just a matter of time before one shows up.

38. Which is why Nasa launched the Kepler telescope in March. It will survey 100,000 Sun-like stars over the next four years, looking for Earth-like planets in the "Goldilocks Zone" – a distance from the Sun that is not too hot and not too cold.

39. Some think early flying saucer stories originated from spottings of experimental Nazi aircraft.

40. In June this year, Seti upgraded its Serendip (Search for Extraterrestrial Radio Emissions from Nearby Developed Intelligent Populations) programme at Arecibo. The first programme listened to 100 channels simultaneously, the new programme can track more than two billion.

41. ET and Close Encounters director Steven Spielberg has been obsessed with the search for life outside our planet since childhood and donates money to Seti.

42. llie Arroway, Jodie Foster's character in the film Contact, finds aliens using the same methods as a Seti radio-wave analysing programme Project Phoenix based in Australia.

43. Those hopeful of so-called "exo-biology" have been encouraged by recent discoveries of the building blocks of life floating around in space. Radio telescopes have picked up the chemical signatures of 150 molecules in interstellar space, including sugar, alcohol and amino acids.

44. The twin Voyager space probes, launched in 1977, carried gold discs containing information about Earth, including recordings of greetings in 54 different human languages, humpback whale song, 117 pictures of Earth and a collection of sounds including music from Mozart to Louis Armstrong. The discs were put together by the Seti advocate Carl Sagan at the request of Nasa. It will be 40,000 years before the discs get anywhere near another planetary system.

45. If aliens do find them, they will need to locate an old vinyl record player. Fortunately, there are instructions and a stylus on the spaceship.

46. In the 1820s the German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss, below, tried to contact aliens by reflecting sunlight towards planets. He also wanted to cut a giant triangle into the Siberian forest and plant wheat inside to show a geometric object visible from the Moon.

47. Around the same time, the Austrian mathematician Joseph Johann von Littrow proposed digging a circular canal in the Sahara 20 miles in diameter, filling it with paraffin and setting it on fire, thus alerting alien species to our existence.

48. Charles Cros, a French poet and inventor, thought spots of light on Mars and Venus were indicators of civilisations. He tried to convince the French government to build a giant mirror to communicate with the aliens. The lights he saw were probably noctilucent clouds (clouds so high they reflect sunlight at night); the mirror was almost certainly impossible to build.

49. Japan has prepared guidelines on how to handle aliens if they land and a strategy to defend the country from alien attack.

50. Early alien hunters at the 1960 conference at Green Bank, West Virginia, which established Seti as a scientific discipline, called themselves the Order of the Dolphin in honour of John Lilly, who had recently concluded that dolphins were intelligent and pioneered attempts to communicate with them.
De vraag is dan: hoe zinloos of zinvol is zo'n zoektocht? Kunnen we conclusies trekken uit min of meer 50 jaar radiostilte? Hoe betrouwbaar zijn onze overpeinzingen over buitenaards leven? En natuurlijk: is de volgende communicatiepoging weer een Beatles-liedje of worden het de Rolling Stones? :7

[ Bericht 0% gewijzigd door Perrin op 22-07-2015 09:56:06 ]
pi_80373907
SOS?
Rust zacht lieve Koof. Ik ga je missen. xxx
pi_80373973
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 09:47 schreef Netsplitter het volgende:
SOS?
Ja, dat komt wel een beetje wanhopig over hé Heb de TT ff veranderd
pi_80374032
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 09:49 schreef Haushofer het volgende:

[..]

Ja, dat komt wel een beetje wanhopig over hé Heb de TT ff veranderd
Beetje maar.

Ik denk dat er echt wel leven is buiten in die onmetelijke ruimte.
Alleen vrees ik dat tegen de tijd dat onze signalen hun bereikt hebben dat wij allang mol zijn.
Als mensheid of als planeet zijnde.
Rust zacht lieve Koof. Ik ga je missen. xxx
pi_80374239
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 09:45 schreef Haushofer het volgende:
[ afbeelding ]


Deze maand is het 50 jaar geleden dat SETI werd opgestart door , de zoektocht naar buitenaards leven. Hier 50 SETI-feitjes op een rij:
[..]

De vraag is dan: hoe zinloos of zinvol is zo'n zoektocht? Kunnen we conclusies trekken uit min of meer 50 jaar radiostilte? Hoe betrouwbaar zijn onze overpeinzingen over buitenaards leven? En natuurlijk: is de volgende communicatiepoging weer een Beatles-liedje of worden het de Rolling Stones?
Probleem is wel dat die 50 jaar nogal kort zijn en dat we pas een relatief klein gedeelte van de ruimte om ons heen hebben afgezocht. Dus ik denk dat je nog niet kan zeggen of er überhaupt signalen zijn om op te vangen.
Daarentegen is SETI wel vrij nutteloos als je kijkt naar praktische gevolgen van een eventuele ontdekking. Anders dan de menselijke nieuwsgierigheid te bevredigen, zie ik geen echt nut van het opvangen van "alien" signalen. Communiceren kunnen we er (nog) niet mee. En daarnaast heb je nog de vraag of wij ùberhaupt wel willen communiceren. Luisteren is prima, uitzenden misschien niet.

Maar het draaien van de seti boinc manager op mijn computer blijft wel even doorgaan, zo nieuwsgierig ben ik dan wel weer
You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe
C. Sagan
  vrijdag 16 april 2010 @ 10:20:13 #6
98593 KlappernootatWork
Tot mijn strot in het genot..
pi_80374919
Ik denk eerder dat écht intelligente wezens géén radio gebruiken.

Het heelal is vol met stoor"zenders": neutronensterren, gaswolken, electrische stormen en zou voor radiocommunicatie niet adequaat genoeg zijn. ik vermoed dat er andere communicatiemiddelen gebruikt worden. Zelfs op mars (interstellair een blokje om) maakt het besturen van een simpele mars buggie al een moeilijke onderneming. Dus ik ga er van uit dat et's iets gebruiken wat universeel te gebruiken is van grote afstanden en in realtime (misschien communicatie met strings?) wie zal het zeggen..
Shit! werken zuigt...
Op donderdag 22 november 2007 @ 12:42 schreef Neelis het volgende: Rabbelneuteaantwaark ?
pi_80375311
quote:
Kunnen we conclusies trekken uit min of meer 50 jaar radiostilte?
Ik denk het niet. 50 jaar is op kosmische schaal nagenoeg niets.

En ik denk dat er wel degelijk buitenaards leven is, al dan niet intelligent.
Het is zo massive dat het in mijn ogen eerder niet voor te stellen is dat er nergens anders leven is.



De vraag is alleen, gaan we elkaar ooit tegen komen? De afstanden zijn zo fucking groot.
De oude oude layout was veel beter!!
vosss is de naam,
met dubbel s welteverstaan.
Klik hier NIET!!!!
pi_80377102
De afstanden zijn heel vaak zo groot dat een signaal er wel 5.000 jaar over kan doen om de aarde te bereiken. In dat soort gevallen is het zinvoller om onderzoek te doen naar supersnelle verplaatsingsmogelijkheden in het heelal (sneller dan het licht).

Stel dat sneller dan het licht mogelijk is (door wormholes en dat soort zaken) en een reis naar een bewoonde planeet zou nog "maar" 50 jaar duren. Dat geeft ons aardig wat tijd om die technologie te ontwikkelen, voordat het radiosignaal wat we erheen hebben gestuurd om te "communiceren" daar aankomt...
pi_80380295
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 10:20 schreef KlappernootatWork het volgende:
Ik denk eerder dat écht intelligente wezens géén radio gebruiken.

Het heelal is vol met stoor"zenders": neutronensterren, gaswolken, electrische stormen en zou voor radiocommunicatie niet adequaat genoeg zijn. ik vermoed dat er andere communicatiemiddelen gebruikt worden. Zelfs op mars (interstellair een blokje om) maakt het besturen van een simpele mars buggie al een moeilijke onderneming. Dus ik ga er van uit dat et's iets gebruiken wat universeel te gebruiken is van grote afstanden en in realtime (misschien communicatie met strings?) wie zal het zeggen..
SETI is niet alleen op zoek naar signalen die bewust zijn verzonden, maar ook naar signalen die onbewust de ruimte in geslingerd zijn. Denk aan onze kleine eeuw van radiouitzendingen. Die gaan zowel naar je radio als naar elke ster in de buurt (Als je maar lang genoeg wacht). Deze signalen kunnen uiteindelijk ook opgepikt worden.
Nu verandert er wel een boel in onze uitzending van signalen, steeds minder gaat via de "ether". Steeds meer gaat via kabels en aldus wordt de aarde steeds stiller.

Los daarvan is natuurlijk het feit dat wij geen signalen uitzenden om echt te communiceren (met "aliens" bedoel ik). Als we al een signaal uitzenden, dan is het een eenrichtingsweg, we weten dat er geen echt antwoord op komt. En dan is radio niet eens zo slecht niet. Goedkoop en technisch niet moeilijk te ontvangen. Je kunt wel ene mooie techniek verzinnen met verstrengelde fotonen die juist gemanipuleerd een boodschap overbrengen, maar als de ontvanger niet weet wat er mee te doen....

SETI is niet opgezet om te communiceren, het is opgezet om "slechts" signalen te ontdekken...
You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe
C. Sagan
pi_80383610
2. Ik snap dat van machines nooit zo goed. Je kunt het beste machines bouwen met proteine. Maar dat bedoelt hij natuurlijk niet.
3. Het kan gewoon 1 zijn. En dat zijn wij. Geen rede waarom dat onmogelijk zou zijn.
10. Zonder de Allen arrey is SETI echt hopeloos.
15. Het is extreem dom om zomaar onze DNA de ruimte in te zenden. Die wetenschappers moeten echt gedacht hebben dat het onmogelijk was dat aliens het zouden ontvangen en decoderen. Anders doe je dat toch niet!
17. Waarom zouden aliens hier na toe komen voor grondstoffen? Als ze hier heen kunnen komen waarom niet een paar andere sterrenstelsels die dichterbij zijn consumeren? En het is niet echt dat we zien dat sterrenstelsels overal omgezet worden in Dyson spheres.
20. Snap niet wat machines te maken hebben met wormhole technologie.
28. Juist. SETI kijkt naar hele specifike spectra. Dat daar toevallig signalen in zitten zou heel,.. toevallig zijn.
29. Je kunt bij de Drake equation elk antwoord krijgen van 0 tot enorm veel, door de parameters aan te passen. En niemand die je kan bewijzen dat je die parameters niet zo in mag vullen.
38. Als er echt veel leven in het universum is is de kans dat we dit binnen 60 jaar bijna zeker weten hoger dan 50% als je het mij vraagt. Kepler binnen een paar jaar die planeten zelf al vinden.

Naja, een paar comments.
pi_80470916
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 10:20 schreef KlappernootatWork het volgende:
Ik denk eerder dat écht intelligente wezens géén radio gebruiken.

Het heelal is vol met stoor"zenders": neutronensterren, gaswolken, electrische stormen en zou voor radiocommunicatie niet adequaat genoeg zijn. ik vermoed dat er andere communicatiemiddelen gebruikt worden. Zelfs op mars (interstellair een blokje om) maakt het besturen van een simpele mars buggie al een moeilijke onderneming. Dus ik ga er van uit dat et's iets gebruiken wat universeel te gebruiken is van grote afstanden en in realtime (misschien communicatie met strings?) wie zal het zeggen..
Jammer dat je quantum verstrengeling niet kunt gebruiken om te communiceren, dat zou de boel wel wat makkelijker maken
pi_80472873
quote:
Op vrijdag 16 april 2010 10:30 schreef vosss het volgende:

[..]

Ik denk het niet. 50 jaar is op kosmische schaal nagenoeg niets.

En ik denk dat er wel degelijk buitenaards leven is, al dan niet intelligent.

Het is zo massive dat het in mijn ogen eerder niet voor te stellen is dat er nergens anders leven is.
Ik zie deze argumentatie zo vaak. “Het heelal is enorm, dus er moet nog ergens anders leven zijn”. Niet alleen is deze redenatie deductief volslagen onlogisch, het is volgens mij ook nog eens vrijwel onmogelijk. Vandaar dat ik SETI dus ook een compleet zinloos project vindt, behalve als men het zinnig vindt om geld over de balk te gooien.

In dit heelal doen zich de volgende opties voor.

1: Het heelal en materie in het heelal is oneindig. Dit zou niet alleen betekenen dat er ergens anders leven is, dit zou betekenen dat er oneindig veel leven is. Nu, ik kan heel veel over deze optie zeggen maar ik zal het op twee dingen houden. Op de eerste plaats is ‘oneindig’ alleen een theoretisch concept en is het een praktische onmogelijkheid (in ons heelal kan niets a priori oneindig zijn, leidt tot een logische contradictie). Belangrijker: wij weten het een en ander over het heelal; we weten dat het een begin heeft gehad, we weten ongeveer hoeveel massa het heelal bezit. Bovendien stellen de thermodynamische wetten dat er geen massa/energie bij het heelal gevoegd kan worden, dus zelfs al zou het heelal zelf (dwz de ruimtetijd) oneindig zijn, de massa en daarmee dus de substantie van het universum is dit zeker niet.

2: De materie van het heelal (en wellicht het heelal zelf) is eindig. Dit is wat wetenschappers op dit moment denken. Er zijn ongeveer 200 miljard sterrenstelsels, met elk ongeveer 100 miljard sterren. Dan wordt het een probabilistisch vraagstuk, namelijk: is het mogelijk dat in een universum met zo’n omvang leven voor een tweede keer spontaan ontstaat. Als je dan de kans weet op het ontstaan van leven, kun je gaan rekenen.

Het probleem is dat niemand exact de kans op het ontstaan van leven weet. Wel denken de meeste wetenschappers dat de kans heel erg klein moet zijn. Er zijn zoveel factoren die geschikt moeten zijn voor het überhaupt mogelijk zijn van leven dat 99% van het universum al afvalt. Even wat feiten op een rij.

1: Er zijn maar twee atomen die vier verbindingen met andere atomen kunnen aangaan, nodig voor complex leven. Dat zijn koolstof en silicium. Silicium heeft een aantal problematische eigenschappen waardoor het ongeschikt zou zijn voor het ontstaan van een levensvorm. Dus je hebt koolstof nodig.
2: Koolstof ontstaat in sterren, je moet dus in of dichtbij een sterrenstelsel zitten. Daarmee valt alle open ruimte tussen sterrenstelsel weg: daar bevinden zich geen sterren.
3: Je hebt ook water nodig. Water is het meest interactieve molecuul wat er bestaat, de meeste voedingsstoffen lossen erin op en ook het feit dat water, in vaste vorm lichter is dan in haar vloeibare vorm is noodzakelijk voor leven. (zie http://astrobiology.nasa.(...)st/question/?id=178)
4. Water in vloeibare vorm komt alleen voor op planeten, en nog specifieker, planeten die een baan om een ster hebben waarbij de temperatuur niet constant onder de 0 graden is of boven de 100 graden. Deze baan heet de Habitable Zone: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habitable_zone
5. Ook de locatie binnen een sterrenstelsel is van belang. Het centrum van een sterrenstelsel bevat teveel straling voor leven; de ringen zijn geboorteplaatsen voor nieuwe sterren en derhalve ook problematisch. Het beste is om tussen de ringen te zitten.
6. Bovenstaande is nog slechts de juiste planeet. Dan moet leven nog tot ontstaan komen, dus een complex mechanisme dat zichzelf kan repliceren moet spontaan ontstaan. De kans hierop is voor zover wij weten zeer klein.

Ik zou deze lijst gigantisch veel groter kunnen maken, maar ik hoop dat ik mijn punt heb gemaakt. Zelfs in dit hele grote heelal is de kans op het ontstaan van leven wellicht nog heel erg klein. Het feit dat wij er zijn is dan al bijzonder, laat staan dat er nog andere levensbronnen zijn. Natuurlijk zitten er wat assumpties vast aan dit argumenten, en wellicht blijken die later incorrect te zijn, maar voor zover wij nu kunnen weten met onze huidige kennis is het nogal irrationeel om in aliens te geloven.
pi_80475807
Rare vraagstelling.Je doet het nu net voorkomen of we 50 jaar lang geen waarnemingen hebben gedaan. Terwijl we juist heel veel waarnemingen hebben, dat is toch juist betekenisvol?
Mu!
  maandag 19 april 2010 @ 12:15:57 #14
98593 KlappernootatWork
Tot mijn strot in het genot..
pi_80476379
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 09:21 schreef Haushofer het volgende:

[..]

Jammer dat je quantum verstrengeling niet kunt gebruiken om te communiceren, dat zou de boel wel wat makkelijker maken
of iets anders, ik heb zo'n vermoeden dat onze communicatie nog op een holbewonerspeil staat. Het is alsof een indiaan met rooksignalen zijn zus in de grote stad op haar mobieltje probeert te bereiken.

Ondanks dezelfde universele taal toch geen communicatie..
Shit! werken zuigt...
Op donderdag 22 november 2007 @ 12:42 schreef Neelis het volgende: Rabbelneuteaantwaark ?
pi_80476840
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 10:40 schreef jdschoone het volgende:

[..]

Ik zie deze argumentatie zo vaak. “Het heelal is enorm, dus er moet nog ergens anders leven zijn”. Niet alleen is deze redenatie deductief volslagen onlogisch, het is volgens mij ook nog eens vrijwel onmogelijk. Vandaar dat ik SETI dus ook een compleet zinloos project vindt, behalve als men het zinnig vindt om geld over de balk te gooien.

In dit heelal doen zich de volgende opties voor.

1: Het heelal en materie in het heelal is oneindig. Dit zou niet alleen betekenen dat er ergens anders leven is, dit zou betekenen dat er oneindig veel leven is. Nu, ik kan heel veel over deze optie zeggen maar ik zal het op twee dingen houden. Op de eerste plaats is ‘oneindig’ alleen een theoretisch concept en is het een praktische onmogelijkheid (in ons heelal kan niets a priori oneindig zijn, leidt tot een logische contradictie). Belangrijker: wij weten het een en ander over het heelal; we weten dat het een begin heeft gehad, we weten ongeveer hoeveel massa het heelal bezit. Bovendien stellen de thermodynamische wetten dat er geen massa/energie bij het heelal gevoegd kan worden, dus zelfs al zou het heelal zelf (dwz de ruimtetijd) oneindig zijn, de massa en daarmee dus de substantie van het universum is dit zeker niet.

2: De materie van het heelal (en wellicht het heelal zelf) is eindig. Dit is wat wetenschappers op dit moment denken. Er zijn ongeveer 200 miljard sterrenstelsels, met elk ongeveer 100 miljard sterren. Dan wordt het een probabilistisch vraagstuk, namelijk: is het mogelijk dat in een universum met zo’n omvang leven voor een tweede keer spontaan ontstaat. Als je dan de kans weet op het ontstaan van leven, kun je gaan rekenen.

Het probleem is dat niemand exact de kans op het ontstaan van leven weet. Wel denken de meeste wetenschappers dat de kans heel erg klein moet zijn. Er zijn zoveel factoren die geschikt moeten zijn voor het überhaupt mogelijk zijn van leven dat 99% van het universum al afvalt. Even wat feiten op een rij.

1: Er zijn maar twee atomen die vier verbindingen met andere atomen kunnen aangaan, nodig voor complex leven. Dat zijn koolstof en silicium. Silicium heeft een aantal problematische eigenschappen waardoor het ongeschikt zou zijn voor het ontstaan van een levensvorm. Dus je hebt koolstof nodig.
2: Koolstof ontstaat in sterren, je moet dus in of dichtbij een sterrenstelsel zitten. Daarmee valt alle open ruimte tussen sterrenstelsel weg: daar bevinden zich geen sterren.
3: Je hebt ook water nodig. Water is het meest interactieve molecuul wat er bestaat, de meeste voedingsstoffen lossen erin op en ook het feit dat water, in vaste vorm lichter is dan in haar vloeibare vorm is noodzakelijk voor leven. (zie http://astrobiology.nasa.(...)st/question/?id=178)
4. Water in vloeibare vorm komt alleen voor op planeten, en nog specifieker, planeten die een baan om een ster hebben waarbij de temperatuur niet constant onder de 0 graden is of boven de 100 graden. Deze baan heet de Habitable Zone: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habitable_zone
5. Ook de locatie binnen een sterrenstelsel is van belang. Het centrum van een sterrenstelsel bevat teveel straling voor leven; de ringen zijn geboorteplaatsen voor nieuwe sterren en derhalve ook problematisch. Het beste is om tussen de ringen te zitten.
6. Bovenstaande is nog slechts de juiste planeet. Dan moet leven nog tot ontstaan komen, dus een complex mechanisme dat zichzelf kan repliceren moet spontaan ontstaan. De kans hierop is voor zover wij weten zeer klein.

Ik zou deze lijst gigantisch veel groter kunnen maken, maar ik hoop dat ik mijn punt heb gemaakt. Zelfs in dit hele grote heelal is de kans op het ontstaan van leven wellicht nog heel erg klein. Het feit dat wij er zijn is dan al bijzonder, laat staan dat er nog andere levensbronnen zijn. Natuurlijk zitten er wat assumpties vast aan dit argumenten, en wellicht blijken die later incorrect te zijn, maar voor zover wij nu kunnen weten met onze huidige kennis is het nogal irrationeel om in aliens te geloven.
De laatste 10 jaar is men door middel van onderzoek er wel achter gekomen dat leven zelf veel taaier is dan men eerst dacht. Eenmaal ontstaan schijnt het vrij moeilijk compleet uit te roeien te zijn. De habitable zone is een must voor leven. Maar met 20.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 sterren in het heelal maak je mij niet wijs dat slechts een handjevol (een paar honderd bijvoorbeeld) sterren een planeet hebben draaien in de habitable zone.

Daarnaast bevat het heelal 90% oid donkere materie waarvan wij niet goed weten wat het is. Grote kans dat leven hieruit kan bestaan.

Ten derde: wie zegt dat het leven zuurstof en water nodig heeft? Ik denk dat er levensvormen zijn die wij gewoon niet kunnen voorstellen... Vroeger dacht men ook dat atomen de kleinste elementen waren...
pi_80478881
Niet weer iemand die zegt dat leven geen vloeibaar water nodig heeft...
pi_80479231
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 13:22 schreef Prometheus4096 het volgende:
Niet weer iemand die zegt dat leven geen vloeibaar water nodig heeft...
Ik sluit het niet uit, het is namelijk nog niet bewezen dat het niet zo is. Kwestie van out of the box denken zeg maar...
  maandag 19 april 2010 @ 13:38:14 #18
8369 speknek
(((Globali$t)))
pi_80479429
Waarschijnlijk is het nogal nutteloos. Laten we eerst uberhaupt maar eens buitenaards leven vinden, bijvoorbeeld microben op Mars. Nu richten we ons nog specifiek op planeten die veel op de aarde lijken. Die zijn er genoeg, maar allemaal niet erg dichtbij. Maar misschien moeten we helemaal niet naar Aardes kijken. Als we beter weten waar we naar moeten zoeken hebben we al heel wat meer kans.

Alleen is een beetje radiosignaleren luisteren natuurlijk vrij gemakkelijk en niet zo kostbaar (althans, na initiele investeringen). Dus het kan ook weinig kwaad ermee door te gaan.
pi_80481596
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 12:27 schreef AlmightyArjen het volgende:

[..]

De laatste 10 jaar is men door middel van onderzoek er wel achter gekomen dat leven zelf veel taaier is dan men eerst dacht. Eenmaal ontstaan schijnt het vrij moeilijk compleet uit te roeien te zijn.
Weet je toevallig welk onderzoek en waarnaar? Hetgeen ik heb begrepen suggereert namelijk het tegenovergestelde. Zoals je wellicht weet heeft zuurstof een negatieve werking op de vorming van complexe moleculen als DNA (zuurstof breekt die ontwikkeling af). Het werd dan ook aangenomen dat er geen of vrij weinig zuurstof op de primitieve aarde aanwezig was ten tijde van het ontstaan van leven. Toch blijkt nu uit recenter onderzoek dat er veel meer zuurstof aanwezig was dan werd gedacht, waarschijnlijk afkomstig van de zon. Als dit het geval is heeft het vergaande consequenties voor ook andere planeten.
quote:
De habitable zone is een must voor leven. Maar met 20.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 sterren in het heelal maak je mij niet wijs dat slechts een handjevol (een paar honderd bijvoorbeeld) sterren een planeet hebben draaien in de habitable zone.
Ja, er zijn inderdaad een heleboel sterren. Maar de vraag is inderdaad hoeveel van de sterren voldoen aan de eisen, waarvan de habitable zone er slechts eentje van is. Er zijn hier wel berekeningen naar gedaan, maar natuurlijk zijn deze controversieel. Je kunt bijvoorbeeld uitrekenen hoeveel mogelijke stabiele banen er zijn rond een ster met een bepaalde massa, en kijken hoeveel van deze mogelijke banen zich in de habitable zone bevinden. Natuurlijk is er ook veel kritiek op dit soort rekenmethoden, gebaseerd op talloze assumpties. Maar wat voor mij doorslaggevend is, is het grote aantal van de eisen die nodig zijn. Voor stabiel leven heeft een planeet bijvoorbeeld ook een grote maan nodig (voor de getijden), een tilt (voor seizoenen), tektonische plaatbeweging (voor de koolstofcyclus), een ijzeren kern (bescherming aarde tegen straling zon), enzovoorts. Er zijn circa 50 van dit soort noodzakelijkheden voor leven, en deze lijken niet met elkaar in verband te staan (het is niet zo dat alle planeten met ijzeren kern ook tektonische activiteit hebben bijvoorbeeld). En een planeet vinden met slechts 1 van deze eigenschappen is moeilijk, laat staan alle 50. Dit heet dan ook in de woorden van Paul Davies en Goldilocks Enigma: je zoekt een planeet die precies goed is.

20.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 sterren lijkt misschien heel veel. Maar kijk eens naar het volgende getal: 1.267.650.600.228.229.401.496.703.205.376. Dat getal is 100 keer achter elkaar kop gooien met een muntstuk. Het getal is ook een aantal orden groter dan het aantal sterren in dit universum. Kun je wellicht begrijpen waarom ik denk dat die 50 dingen die nodig zijn voor leven lastiger te krijgen zijn dan 100 keer kop gooien?
quote:
Daarnaast bevat het heelal 90% oid donkere materie waarvan wij niet goed weten wat het is. Grote kans dat leven hieruit kan bestaan.
Als we niet goed weten wat het is, waarom denk je dan dat er een grote kans is dat leven eruit kan ontstaan?
quote:
Ten derde: wie zegt dat het leven zuurstof en water nodig heeft? Ik denk dat er levensvormen zijn die wij gewoon niet kunnen voorstellen... Vroeger dacht men ook dat atomen de kleinste elementen waren...
Oh ja, ik zal de eerste zijn die beaamt dat wetenschap het ‘fout’ kan hebben. Maar dat wil niet zeggen dat je a priori ervan uit moet gaan dat de wetenschap het altijd fout heeft; dan kun je net zo goed stoppen met wetenschap beoefenen. Je moddert voort zo goed als het gaat. En met de huidige kennis die we hebben zie ik niet hoe het bestaan van andersoortig leven mogelijk is. Complexe biologische moleculen hebben koolstof en water nodig.
  maandag 19 april 2010 @ 14:48:43 #20
98593 KlappernootatWork
Tot mijn strot in het genot..
pi_80482152
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 13:33 schreef AlmightyArjen het volgende:

[..]

Ik sluit het niet uit, het is namelijk nog niet bewezen dat het niet zo is. Kwestie van out of the box denken zeg maar...
idd. leven HOEFT niet ontstaan te zijn uit koolstof, maar misschien wel uit silicaten.
Shit! werken zuigt...
Op donderdag 22 november 2007 @ 12:42 schreef Neelis het volgende: Rabbelneuteaantwaark ?
pi_80482245
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 14:35 schreef jdschoone het volgende:

[..]

Weet je toevallig welk onderzoek en waarnaar? Hetgeen ik heb begrepen suggereert namelijk het tegenovergestelde. Zoals je wellicht weet heeft zuurstof een negatieve werking op de vorming van complexe moleculen als DNA (zuurstof breekt die ontwikkeling af). Het werd dan ook aangenomen dat er geen of vrij weinig zuurstof op de primitieve aarde aanwezig was ten tijde van het ontstaan van leven. Toch blijkt nu uit recenter onderzoek dat er veel meer zuurstof aanwezig was dan werd gedacht, waarschijnlijk afkomstig van de zon. Als dit het geval is heeft het vergaande consequenties voor ook andere planeten.
[..]

Ja, er zijn inderdaad een heleboel sterren. Maar de vraag is inderdaad hoeveel van de sterren voldoen aan de eisen, waarvan de habitable zone er slechts eentje van is. Er zijn hier wel berekeningen naar gedaan, maar natuurlijk zijn deze controversieel. Je kunt bijvoorbeeld uitrekenen hoeveel mogelijke stabiele banen er zijn rond een ster met een bepaalde massa, en kijken hoeveel van deze mogelijke banen zich in de habitable zone bevinden. Natuurlijk is er ook veel kritiek op dit soort rekenmethoden, gebaseerd op talloze assumpties. Maar wat voor mij doorslaggevend is, is het grote aantal van de eisen die nodig zijn. Voor stabiel leven heeft een planeet bijvoorbeeld ook een grote maan nodig (voor de getijden), een tilt (voor seizoenen), tektonische plaatbeweging (voor de koolstofcyclus), een ijzeren kern (bescherming aarde tegen straling zon), enzovoorts. Er zijn circa 50 van dit soort noodzakelijkheden voor leven, en deze lijken niet met elkaar in verband te staan (het is niet zo dat alle planeten met ijzeren kern ook tektonische activiteit hebben bijvoorbeeld). En een planeet vinden met slechts 1 van deze eigenschappen is moeilijk, laat staan alle 50. Dit heet dan ook in de woorden van Paul Davies en Goldilocks Enigma: je zoekt een planeet die precies goed is.

20.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 sterren lijkt misschien heel veel. Maar kijk eens naar het volgende getal: 1.267.650.600.228.229.401.496.703.205.376. Dat getal is 100 keer achter elkaar kop gooien met een muntstuk. Het getal is ook een aantal orden groter dan het aantal sterren in dit universum. Kun je wellicht begrijpen waarom ik denk dat die 50 dingen die nodig zijn voor leven lastiger te krijgen zijn dan 100 keer kop gooien?
[..]

Als we niet goed weten wat het is, waarom denk je dan dat er een grote kans is dat leven eruit kan ontstaan?
[..]

Oh ja, ik zal de eerste zijn die beaamt dat wetenschap het ‘fout’ kan hebben. Maar dat wil niet zeggen dat je a priori ervan uit moet gaan dat de wetenschap het altijd fout heeft; dan kun je net zo goed stoppen met wetenschap beoefenen. Je moddert voort zo goed als het gaat. En met de huidige kennis die we hebben zie ik niet hoe het bestaan van andersoortig leven mogelijk is. Complexe biologische moleculen hebben koolstof en water nodig.
Ik snap je punt, maar het vetgedrukte stuk gaat me wat te ver. Dit zijn inderdaad allemaal eisen voor het leven op aarde, maar niemand zegt dat buitenaards leven exact zo zou moeten zijn als op aarde.

Op vrolijkere noot:

Knowledge is power. France is Bacon.
pi_80482850
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 14:35 schreef jdschoone het volgende:
20.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 sterren lijkt misschien heel veel. Maar kijk eens naar het volgende getal: 1.267.650.600.228.229.401.496.703.205.376. Dat getal is 100 keer achter elkaar kop gooien met een muntstuk. Het getal is ook een aantal orden groter dan het aantal sterren in dit universum. Kun je wellicht begrijpen waarom ik denk dat die 50 dingen die nodig zijn voor leven lastiger te krijgen zijn dan 100 keer kop gooien?
Ik heb het gevoel dat deze vergelijking niet op gaat. kop of munt is 50/50, een planeet die leven kan bieden is niet goed/fout maar kan veel meer variatie hebben.
quote:
Als we niet goed weten wat het is, waarom denk je dan dat er een grote kans is dat leven eruit kan ontstaan?
Ik zei dat de kans groot is dat leven hieruit KAN bestaan. of het daadwerkelijk zo is weten we uiteraard niet...
quote:
Oh ja, ik zal de eerste zijn die beaamt dat wetenschap het ‘fout’ kan hebben. Maar dat wil niet zeggen dat je a priori ervan uit moet gaan dat de wetenschap het altijd fout heeft; dan kun je net zo goed stoppen met wetenschap beoefenen. Je moddert voort zo goed als het gaat. En met de huidige kennis die we hebben zie ik niet hoe het bestaan van andersoortig leven mogelijk is. Complexe biologische moleculen hebben koolstof en water nodig.
Nee, ik zeg niet dat de wetenschap het fout heeft. Ik denk dat de wetenschap het vaak goed heeft. Echter zijn we in een dusdanig primitief stadium van de wetenschap dat we heel veel dingen niet weten en dus ook onmogelijk verklaren... als iets niet zeker is uitgesloten, dan hou ik er liever een open mind over...

Ik geloof niet in God maar het is nog niet bewezen dat hij niet bestaat dus tot die tijd hou ik er een open mind over. (al zou het bewijs van het bestaan van God bij mij toch wel een enorm WTF-momentje opleveren...)
pi_80498469
Nu wordt er gezocht naar signalen uit de ruimte in het microgolf gebied omdat wij nu eenmaal de radioteleskopen hebben die dat kunnen ontvangen.
Kan de zoektocht niet beter uitgebreid worden in het gebied van lichtgolven?
Gemoduleerd laserlicht kan ook een belangrijk communicatiemiddel zijn bij de aliens.
Lichtteleskopen hebben we ook in meer dan voldoende mate beschikbaar.
pi_80498727
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 21:32 schreef Schonedal het volgende:
Nu wordt er gezocht naar signalen uit de ruimte in het microgolf gebied omdat wij nu eenmaal de radioteleskopen hebben die dat kunnen ontvangen.
Kan de zoektocht niet beter uitgebreid worden in het gebied van lichtgolven?
Gemoduleerd laserlicht kan ook een belangrijk communicatiemiddel zijn bij de aliens.
Lichtteleskopen hebben we ook in meer dan voldoende mate beschikbaar.
Er zijn meerdere redenen waarom zo ooit met microgolven begonnen zijn. (de techniek was er al, maar ook is het universum relatief stil op het gebied van microgolven.)
Maar ze zijn ook bezig met optisch zoeken:
quote:
Today, we have technology to generate visible and infra-red light at very high power levels indeed (using lasers, something that hadn't even been invented yet when SETI science was born). And, we have sensitive receivers for detecting laser flashes. So, we now practice optical SETI, looking for what you call "light."
Bron
You can't convince a believer of anything; for their belief is not based on evidence, it's based on a deep seated need to believe
C. Sagan
pi_80510586
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 14:48 schreef KlappernootatWork het volgende:

[..]

idd. leven HOEFT niet ontstaan te zijn uit koolstof, maar misschien wel uit silicaten.
quote:
Op maandag 19 april 2010 14:51 schreef picodealion het volgende:

[..]

Ik snap je punt, maar het vetgedrukte stuk gaat me wat te ver. Dit zijn inderdaad allemaal eisen voor het leven op aarde, maar niemand zegt dat buitenaards leven exact zo zou moeten zijn als op aarde.
In de wetenschap spelen assumpties een grote rol. Nu komen assumpties meestal niet uit de lucht vallen. Wetenschappers hebben vaak goede redenen om in een bepaalde assumptie te geloven. Nu is mijn assumptie dat leven, waar het ook maar bestaat in dit universum, noodzakelijk heel erg op leven op aarde zal lijken. En ik heb goede redenen om deze assumptie aan te hangen.

Is het mogelijk dat levensvormen bestaan uit silicium in plaats van koolstof. In theorie, ja, maar dit is zeer onwaarschijnlijk. Silicium komt voor in onze biologie,zoogdieren hebben een klein beetje silicium nodig, planten vaak wat meer. Maar silicium is problematisch als het gaat om de taak van koolstof overnemen. Wellicht het grootste probleem hierbij is dat koolstof polymeren kan vormen (lange, aaneengeschakelde reeksen). Silicium kan dit niet op dezelfde manier. Begrijp je de consequentie hiervan? Voor complex leven zijn complexe moleculen nodig (DNA, eiwitten, enzymen). Silicium kan geen complexe moleculen vormen. Er zijn meer redenen waarom silicium als basis van leven niet waarschijnlijk is, en daarom ga ik er dus vanuit dat ander leven ook op koolstof gebaseerd zal zijn. Let ook op het feit dat silicium, na zuurstof, het meest voorkomt in de aardkorst. Ik zou voorzichtig ook willen suggereren dat als leven uit silicium zou kunnen ontstaan, dit op aarde eerder zou zijn gebeurd dan uit koolstof, dat veel minder voorkomt op aarde (het is het 15de element op aarde, nogmaals, silicium het tweede).

Maar als je dus aan koolstof vastzit als criterium voor leven, dan heb je een soort van recycling van koolstof nodig. Op aarde gebeurd dit door het schuiven van de tektonische platen. Door vulkaanuitbarstingen (zoals nu ook weer in Ijsland) en aardbevingen komt koolstof terug op aarde, en dit is heel erg nodig.

Ik kan zo nog een tijdje doorgaan met allemaal eisen voor leven maar ik hoop dat de teneur duidelijk is. Leven is zeer complex. Zelfs simpel leven is zeer complex. Er is een complex van zaken nodig om complex leven mogelijk te maken. En zelfs al zouden aan alle eisen voldaan worden, dan nog is het maar de vraag of leven ook daadwerkelijk zal ontstaan!

Nu is het wel mogelijk om tegen mijn positie te argumenteren. Je zou bijvoorbeeld kunnen aannemen dat er leven in sterren kan bestaan van een heel ander type. Of je zou kunnen aannemen dat planeten als de aarde heel veel voorkomen. Maar wat zijn de argumenten voor deze aannames? Op wat is het geloof in aliens gebaseerd , anders dan de grootte van het universum zelf? Zolang mensen de hoe vraag niet beantwoorden, blijft het geloof in aliens van dezelfde orde als het geloven in feeën en heksen.

Laten we ook niet vergeten dat de onderzoekers van SETI zelf ervan uitgaan dat leven elders erg zal lijken op aards leven! Ik vind het dan ook zonde dat er zoveel geld wordt uitgegeven aan zulke projecten. We kunnen volgens mij net zo goed geld stoppen in het zoeken naar heksen. Of er iets nuttigs mee doen, zoals ruimtevaarttuigen bouwen…
abonnementen ibood.com bol.com Gearbest
Forum Opties
Forumhop:
Hop naar:
(afkorting, bv 'KLB')